Stuff for future reference

57,283 notes

beastofthewest:

Some hand references.

Sources 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Redid a post by fucktonofanatomyreferencesreborn with sources because they never source anything and I don’t want to reblog that post because I don’t want to support blogs who don’t give credit to people

(No, stating that the art is ~not yours~ and ~came from elsewhere~ IS NOT PROPER CREDIT. Many of these have usernames and such on them but not every single one and you still ought to link back to the specific piece)

I couldn’t source the last one so I didn’t include it.

(Source: brothercoldheart, via anatomicalart)

145,174 notes

I’ve discovered there’s a lot you can do inside haunted houses.

fictionalfeather:

For example, you can:

  • be in a shampoo commercial

image

  • start a boy band:

image

  • spot some choice booty:

image

  • break into song:

image

  • see some people in frankly offensive outfits:

image

  • attend a metal show:

image

  • listen to some sick jams:

image

  • discover zombieism:

image

  • sample some tasty snacks:

image

  • watch someone get burned bad:

image

  • find something you really like:

image

  • find something you really, really like:

image

  • find something you REALLY REALLY LIKE:

image

  • and wonder if you left the stove on:

image

(via teehee111)

1,332 notes

Anonymous asked: Your lines are pretty awesome! How did you make them so lively?

jinn-y:

Aw, shucks. Thank you! I think a lot of it comes from just drawing a lot, but also the understanding of principles like Straights v.s. Curves and line flow. I highly recommend the Drawn to Life book series and Force.

I’ve also started doing this warm-up trick that I learned from my figure drawing professor last semester. Fill a page with circles, lines, squiggles, etc.

image


Doing these will loosen up your wrist and also practice hand motions for quick drawing. It’s really useful!

I also suggest doing lots of gestures, both from reference and from imagination. Pixelovely is great for that. These are some I did not too long ago quickly from imagination:

Just draw fast and loose and don’t think about it too much. Get those drawing principles ingrained into your head to the point where you do it without thinking about it. Practice, practice, practice!

You should also check out Rad’s how-to blog, because it’s chock full of great stuff on drawing principles.

To summarize:

  • Draw a lot
  • Know your anatomy
  • Learn the principles
  • Draw loose with your whole arm
  • Draw a lot!


I hope that answers your question, anon!

2,236 notes

peaceofseoul:

This tutorial explains some of the ways you can incorporate undertones into your art. It starts out very basic for beginners, then shows some more advanced ways to shade. 
If you don’t have photoshop then instead of using a “color burn” layer, experiment with what your program does have. Try a “Multiply” layer or a “shade” layer.

Skin Tones

Finding Undertones

Let me know if you have any questions!

(via coffeeandcockatiels)

16,506 notes

jaramo:

heyo!
don’t worry, your english turned out fine, dude.

as a foreword of warning,
it is best that you don’t use this post as a standalone tutorial, 
instead, try to use it as a study aid to help you make sense of real-life references.
(same applies for any decent “art tutorial” out there, really. :p)

bolded numbers correspond to the numbers on this post’s pictures.

Read More

(via anatomicalart)

33,694 notes

coffeeandcockatiels:

thesilvereye:

If you would like to request a tutorial, you can do so on this post over here!
Eye Coloring Tutorial by me | Other Eye Tutorials: 1 2 3 | My Resource list for Faces and Heads

Good things about drawing eyes. One of my top pet peeves is the far eye being drawn physically smaller; that doesn’t really happen unless you’ve got a fish-eye lens perspective going on in the whole composition. It tends to just look like one eye is smaller than the other, rather than two eyes at an angle.

141,717 notes

z-raid:

fucktonofanatomyreferences:

A glorious fuck-ton of perspective angle references (per request).

[From various sources.]

Sources:

(via coffeeandcockatiels)

4,417 notes

Anonymous asked: How do you draw a profile to match the front face? They end up becoming two different people...

zemael:

I used to have a lot of trouble with this myself until I figured out one simple trick. All you gotta do is know how to work with layers in a program like Photoshop, SAI, Manga Studio, etc, or have a ruler if you’re a traditional artist. 

  • 1. Let’s take a look at this dude. I drew the front of the face first and then tried to match the profile the best I could. Looking at it quickly it seems fine, doesn’t it? (well, other than the eyebrows; I forgot he was frowning.) But when you focus you can tell it looks.. well, off, compared to the one to the left.

  • 2. This part can be a bit tricky. Take each layer and change the lines to a different, contrasting color or make it a different opacity (or both) and then overlap them. To make it less confusing, put the layers as "multiply". This way you can see the lines without confusing them too much.  Try adjusting it to match as good as you can. Now when we have all the parts next to each-other, we can tell what’s wrong. The mouth is too high up, the nose is way too short, the eyes are also too high up, the forehead is too big, and the skull is too small. Thank goodness I at least got the neck and chin right! Let’s adjust these things so that they are at least the right height. (For you traditional artist, just use the ruler to measure the parts!)

  • 3. Now the most obvious things are fixed, and we can see a big improvement. Everything matches height-wise. Nothing is glaringly wrong, but there’s still some details that are off. if you look closely, you can see that the cheek doesn’t quite match up, as well as the eye-shape and the nose shape. Also the expression. (On another note, I made the skull on the blue one a bit smaller, just so you don’t get confused. I noticed it was an anatomy error)

  • 4. Fixed the minor details, and as you can see, there was a major difference. I’m going to make different tutorial on noses later on, but how do you know if a nose is down-turned or up-turned by looking at it from the front? Well, a down-turned nose is usually V-shaped, like the guy in my picture. An up-turned nose usually have more visible nostrils. Anyway. I’m happy with the results, let’s put the finished products next to each other.

  • Yep! We can tell it’s the same guy now. Small things make a huge difference, and this trick is really easy once you get used to it. It might feel a bit trippy at first with all the lines  clashing, but as I said, you get used to it. Let’s see the before-and-after.

  • Not quite the same dude.

But yeah, there you go! If you’re interested to see more of my tutorials, just click [here]. Also, send me an ask if you have any tutorial request, I’d love to help!

4,417 notes

Anonymous asked: How do you draw a profile to match the front face? They end up becoming two different people...

zemael:

I used to have a lot of trouble with this myself until I figured out one simple trick. All you gotta do is know how to work with layers in a program like Photoshop, SAI, Manga Studio, etc, or have a ruler if you’re a traditional artist. 

  • 1. Let’s take a look at this dude. I drew the front of the face first and then tried to match the profile the best I could. Looking at it quickly it seems fine, doesn’t it? (well, other than the eyebrows; I forgot he was frowning.) But when you focus you can tell it looks.. well, off, compared to the one to the left.

  • 2. This part can be a bit tricky. Take each layer and change the lines to a different, contrasting color or make it a different opacity (or both) and then overlap them. To make it less confusing, put the layers as "multiply". This way you can see the lines without confusing them too much.  Try adjusting it to match as good as you can. Now when we have all the parts next to each-other, we can tell what’s wrong. The mouth is too high up, the nose is way too short, the eyes are also too high up, the forehead is too big, and the skull is too small. Thank goodness I at least got the neck and chin right! Let’s adjust these things so that they are at least the right height. (For you traditional artist, just use the ruler to measure the parts!)

  • 3. Now the most obvious things are fixed, and we can see a big improvement. Everything matches height-wise. Nothing is glaringly wrong, but there’s still some details that are off. if you look closely, you can see that the cheek doesn’t quite match up, as well as the eye-shape and the nose shape. Also the expression. (On another note, I made the skull on the blue one a bit smaller, just so you don’t get confused. I noticed it was an anatomy error)

  • 4. Fixed the minor details, and as you can see, there was a major difference. I’m going to make different tutorial on noses later on, but how do you know if a nose is down-turned or up-turned by looking at it from the front? Well, a down-turned nose is usually V-shaped, like the guy in my picture. An up-turned nose usually have more visible nostrils. Anyway. I’m happy with the results, let’s put the finished products next to each other.

  • Yep! We can tell it’s the same guy now. Small things make a huge difference, and this trick is really easy once you get used to it. It might feel a bit trippy at first with all the lines  clashing, but as I said, you get used to it. Let’s see the before-and-after.

  • Not quite the same dude.

But yeah, there you go! If you’re interested to see more of my tutorials, just click [here]. Also, send me an ask if you have any tutorial request, I’d love to help!