Stuff for future reference

21,588 notes

xfreischutz:

I was going to review my french and linguistics but then this happened instead.
Except it’s 3.30am so it’s half-assed. //shotdead

But hopefully people will find this of use. \o/ Sorry this took so long, Anon, and I hope it answers your questions.

(via anatomicalart)

10,414 notes

wishroom:

Bartek Gawel, CDPR’s art director, shares some insight on the importance of head construction for successful character design.

The secret to a good character concept  is its head. Not to brag about the eyes as the mirrors of the soul or the number of emotions a human face can express let’s just get on with it. Because it’s all in the head – believe me.
Any to-be concept artist will have to learn sooner or later how to draw a good face. I decided to take my time and start this little tutorial and share the knowledge, that was gathered by artists and human body experts (scientists to be precise) throughout the ages.
In this episode I’ll write a little bit about the first principal which defines the look and character of the head you are designing. Today I will write about the facial angle.
The most important element you will need while constructing the head is the middle of the ear. This is represented by the red dot on the illustration above.
A line crossing this point and perpendicular to the horizon helps us find the beginning of the neck i.e. the place where the neck meets the chest (point A). Traditional sculptors use a special pendulum  to find the correct line. It’s good if you have an aprentice of any kind to hold it for you, while you’re busy with your work.
The models character is determined by the so called facial angle. This concept was used for the first time in the 18th Century by Petrus Camper, a Dutch anthropologist, scientist and sculptor. He introduced  a constant head position based upon a line drawn from the middle of the ear (red dot)  to the septum (the red line). The second line needed to create the face angle is drawn from the forehead surface with the jaw (yellow line). This angle can have different rays and be even right.
Determining the facial angle allows you to have a base for further head construction and influences the look of the model on an early stage, before you start outlining other elements (e.g. a nose).

[blog post]

wishroom:

Bartek Gawel, CDPR’s art director, shares some insight on the importance of head construction for successful character design.

The secret to a good character concept  is its head. Not to brag about the eyes as the mirrors of the soul or the number of emotions a human face can express let’s just get on with it. Because it’s all in the head – believe me.

Any to-be concept artist will have to learn sooner or later how to draw a good face. I decided to take my time and start this little tutorial and share the knowledge, that was gathered by artists and human body experts (scientists to be precise) throughout the ages.

In this episode I’ll write a little bit about the first principal which defines the look and character of the head you are designing. Today I will write about the facial angle.

The most important element you will need while constructing the head is the middle of the ear. This is represented by the red dot on the illustration above.

A line crossing this point and perpendicular to the horizon helps us find the beginning of the neck i.e. the place where the neck meets the chest (point A). Traditional sculptors use a special pendulum  to find the correct line. It’s good if you have an aprentice of any kind to hold it for you, while you’re busy with your work.

The models character is determined by the so called facial angle. This concept was used for the first time in the 18th Century by Petrus Camper, a Dutch anthropologist, scientist and sculptor. He introduced  a constant head position based upon a line drawn from the middle of the ear (red dot)  to the septum (the red line). The second line needed to create the face angle is drawn from the forehead surface with the jaw (yellow line). This angle can have different rays and be even right.

Determining the facial angle allows you to have a base for further head construction and influences the look of the model on an early stage, before you start outlining other elements (e.g. a nose).

[blog post]

(via anatomicalart)

29,540 notes

bobbycaputo:

HumanaePortraits Match People of Different Ethnicities With Their Pantone Color

Brazilian fine art photographer Angelica Dass‘ series Humanae identifies portrait subjects from around the world using the Pantone color system. Using an 11×11 pixel swatch from her subjects’ faces, Dass matches them to corresponding Pantone colors, creating an abundant and unique catalog of skin tones that reflects the world’s diversity beyond the categorizations we have long been confined to. We recently asked her more about the ongoing project.

(via anatomicalart)

980 notes

lanadelfuckface asked: Would you be willing to do a lighting/coloring tutorial? Sorry if you've already done one. You're color style is just so beautiful.

bloochikin:

I did one about my painting process here back in September but I can do another one if you’d like c: Though it will require some knowledge of Adobe photoshop. I generally use a calligraphy brush that has the opacity set to pen pressure when I am painting.

So here we have the sketch. This one is going to be a piece of Ed and Sarah form Ed Edd n Eddy. 

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If I am going to have a picture that depends heavily on lighting, I like to go ahead and do some light shading over the sketch just to get a general idea. Btw, both the sketch and shadow layers are set to multiply for the next step. Also, notice the placement of lighting that I gave the scene. Aside from her evil grin, I chose to keep Sarah in shadow to accent her malicious intentions for her brother and to imply that she is the reason, unknown to their mother, that he is being scolded. 

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I like to put a color in the background to fill the entire space first with a color that will represent the overall mood and also so that there won’t be any white spaces peeking through. I also use a clipping mask layer to color the line art so there is no black. When creating a color piece, always try to avoid using pure black and pure white! They aren’t found in nature and look out of place when try to create pieces with lighting because light bounces off of everything.  

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Next I make a layer underneath the sketch and color in the flats without lighting. 

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Now we begin the lighting process. I create a layer over the top of everything and set it to overlay. I then go ahead and pick colors to create the right mood. I chose an orangish yellow for the light coming through the window to mimic sunlight and to contrast with the darker blueish purple color of the shadows. 

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Next I create a normal layer on top of everything again and paint over everything, using the eyedropper too and sampling only from what I already have on the canvas.

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I decided that it was lacking contrast, so I added a curves adjustment layer to heighten the contrast a bit.

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I usually go back and add final touches to the lighting to make it appear more natural. For this picture, I added a soft light layer, an overlay layer, and a linear light layer, with green for the former and golden brown for the latter two. I added the green because I wanted to mute the blueish purple to something a bit more dingy. The golden brown layers I added to make it seem as though the light coming from the window was also bouncing around the room, as does real light.

This could definitely use more cleanup, but that’s basically it! I hope it helped!

17,246 notes

Anonymous asked: I love your art work so much :3 I was just wondering, how do you pick your colors? they are just so beautiful and unique and UGH i cant do colors and it pains me

lemonteaflower:

its about time i try to explain this as the obviously unprofessional i am. 

i just pick colors depending on my mood, there are colors that look colder and warmer, so i take advantage of that 

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do you feel the colors. you gotta feel them. 

then it’s time to pick the best colors for your piece, aka AVOID THESE IF YOU CAN. 

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sometimes they work tho, but why pick those when you can pick these

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they give you cuter colors and better color palettes.

remember to feel how warm or cold or neutral you want anything to look. 

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that’s better looking than the MS Paint default palette. after some time you will be able to choose nice colors, give it a try. (you can also make a new layer with a solid color and set it to Overlay and it should help). 

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then the shading comes in, you’ll eventually realize some colors look better with others. BUT PLEASE PLEASE AVOID SHADING WITH BLACK/GREYS OR MAKING LIGHTS WITH WHITE.

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ew that looks so simple, why do that when yOU COULD BE SHADING WITH COLORS TOO??? 

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yeah that looks more lively. 

i really like colors and that’s why i experiment with them a lot so to fully understand them you could either learn on your own by trying (like me) or you could take color classes, which is good too because they will teach you about other important stuff like this 

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but basically its just 

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don’t take me too seriously because i just fool around with colors hnnn. u3u 

58,450 notes

elixiroverdose:

its been a while since I’ve done anything with tutorials ahhh also my explanations started to die out because I don’t have a lot to say to describe each one. If this helps you, I’m glad. But I would say to just springboard from this! get loose with your poses and have fuuuuun